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in the state of new york. the storm that hit the u.s. northeast put some polling stations out of commission. the governor is relaxing the rules so voters won't be shut out. andrew cuomo issued an executive order allowing residents in areas affected by the storm to vote at any station. officials in neighboring new jersey are also making it easier for people to cast ballots. more than 60 polling stations in new york city are still unusable because of flooding or lack of electricity. workers have set up alternative sites. the voting process in manhattan and the city's other borrows has become more high-tech. they can mark paper ballots and insurt those into a scanner. it's the first time the system will be used in a u.s. presidential election. the results will start streaming in tuesday evening in united states. obama and romney will watch the returns come in from the respective home bases, chicago and boston. >>> obama arrived in his hometown early in the morning with the first lady. the latest polls suggest the president and his republican challenger mitt romney remain locked in a dead heat.
for his second term. >> the belief that while each of us will pursue our own individual dreams, we are an american family and we rise our fall together as one nation and as one people. and in the coming weeks and months, i am looking forward to reaching out and working with leaders of both parties to meet the challenges we can only solve together, reducing our deficit, reforming our tax code, fixing our immigration system, freeing ourselves from foreign oil. we've got more work to do. >>> romney made his concession speech in boston, massachusetts. >> i so wish, i so wish that i had been able to fulfill your hopes to lead the country in a different direction. but the nation chose another leader. so ann and i join with you to earnestly pray for him and for this great nation. >>> americans and people around the world are waiting to see how president obama will address the challenges he mentioned in his victory speech. nhk world's political commentator nakajima joins us. tell us how obama won a second term? >> for a start, he is the incumbent president that puts him in a position of po
. job figures are out in the u.s. today at the battle for the white house goes to ohio and wisconsin. dozens of young men have been shocked by the military in northeastern nigeria. welcome to bbc world news. also, the world bank says burma and will get its first development plan. and, tackling the energy question. human rights groups have condemned a video posted on the internet which appears to show syrian rebels of executing captured government soldiers. amnesty international says if confirmed, it constitutes a war crime. we are asking whether this is something new. >> it has happened before. but now it is becoming more and more obvious that the rebels are committing killings like the regime, and at the same level, both of them. it is just days before a big conference in doha where the opposition is asked to unified under one group, in order to bid but to lead the rebels on the ground, because there's a big discrepancy between the political leadership and the rebels on the ground who are fighting, in their aspirations, in the way they are conducting their rebellion. >> are they out
"exit". also, luciana souza is here. we are glad you have joined us. coming up, right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: sara lawrence-lightfoot is a renowned harvard professor and author. her latest book is called "exit: the endings that set us free." good to have the on this program. >> it is great to be here. thank you, tavis. tavis: tell me more about your fascination with endings. >> i have noticed for a very long time, from when i was very young, how we did about x's, departures, bias, in our schools, our neighborhoods, that we are so preoccupied with beginnings, with launchings, was tilting toward the future and seizing opportunities that we neglect the importan
government which still considers the plant a dangerous drug? as the most expensive election in u.s. history comes to a close, we will talk about the issue facing more and more americans that rarely got a mention in the presidential campaign -- poverty. >> the problem is, obama himself no better than romney is still very much part of a system that has failed poor and working people. capitalism is not working for poor and working people in america. we have to bear witness to that. >> we will speak what dr. cornel west and pbs host tavis smiley. together they have written, "the rich and the rest of us: a poverty manifesto." all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. we're on the road in chicago. the pentagon has confirmed that iran fired at a pilotless u.s. drone last week, but missed its target. pentagon spokesperson george little insisted the incident occurred in international, not iranian, airspace, and vowed that u.s. surveillance flights will continue. >> the incident occurred over international waters approximate
general and their women woes. a scandal among the u.s. top brass claims a second scamp amid growing concerns of a security breach. first, the c.i.a. boss general petraeus quits over an affair. now, john allen, email ex changes connected to the scandal. >> also in the program, we report from golden heights where tension is rising after israel and syria exchange fire across their border. in china, it's all change at the top. we have a special report on how the next generation is determined to tread its own path. >> i would like to be a software engineer. >> so you don't want to do the sort of things that your parents did? >> never. >> hello, it's midday here in london, 7:00 in the morning in washington. there's been a new twist to the sex scandal engulfing the american military top brass there. on friday, general david petraeus resigned as boss of the c.i.a. after it was revealed that he had been having an extra marital affair. now general john alan has been drawn into the scandal after what is being called inappropriate communications with a woman also linked to the affair. he has de
tengan is covering the congress. he joins us from beijing. james? >> reporter: gene, this process is carefully choreographed and controlled. chinese authorities are generally restrictive. but the bamboo curtain really comes down during the congress. that makes the job of jury roomism that much harder. still china's political transition is one of the biggest stories going right now. so despite the controls, no media organization wants to miss out. they got up early to get in line outside the great hall of the people. journalists from china and abroad, hundreds of them, all jockeying to get a better position for the opening of the communist party's congress. journalists from around the world have converged on beijing underlying the international community's keen interest on what direction china will take with the changeover in power. chinese government officials say more than 2,700 domestic and international journalists are covering the meeting. media are trying to find out something, anything about this secretive political process. it's not easy. >> it was really difficult to get t
newman's own foundation, and union bank. at union bank our relationship managers use their expertise in global finance to guide you through the business strategies and opportunities of international commerce. we put our extended global network to work for a wide range of companies, from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> it was a storm that rocked america, bringing devastation to the eastern seaboard. we look back at the impact of hurricane sandy. >> i don't know what's going on. >> nobody was ready for this. this has never happened before, ever. >> i had an incredible view of the waves crashing over everything, was so enamored by . >> india to conduct clinical trials how poor indians are being used as human guinea pigs. >> please don't do these trials on poor people. rich people can overcome these, but the whole family suffers. >> it's the technology that's set to transform the manufacturing industry. press control p and get lots of print on paper, but the pen, too. >> i think eventually it will completely transform the way products ar
is called forget about today. we are glad you joined us for a look health care and the influence of bob dylan coming up now. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> the california endowment happens in neighborhoods. learn now. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: dr. eric topol has shared the department of the cleveland clinic. he has directed the transitional science institute's and is the ok.hor of the new boat it is great to have you on the program. >> thank you. >> how will the digital revolution creates a better health care? >> you are used to digitize books and music. how about people? we can get through sequencing once genome. basically everything fed makes you take -- that makes you tick we can change medicine. tavis: give me examples. >> let's sa
. closing arguments have ended in a pretrial hearing to determine whether u.s. staff sergeant robert bales will face a court- martial for allegedly slaughtering 16 afghan civilians, including nine children, in march. military prosecutors are seeking the death penalty while defense attorneys have argued that alcohol abuse, drug use, and posttraumatic stress disorder all may have played a key role in fueling his actions. the presiding officer says he'll issue a recommendation on whether to proceed to court martial by the end of the week. deadly fighting in syria reportedly left at least 63 people dead across the country tuesday, including 41 in the capital damascus. syrian tanks continue to shell the palestinian refugee camp which has seen heavy violence this month. france has become the first western country to recognize syria's newly brokered opposition coalition as the sole representative of the syrian people. the coalition was formed over the weekend at a summit in doma. at least 24 people at and killed and more than 100 wounded in a series of bombings across iraq. a multiple explosions
petraeus. we are glad you have joined us. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: tomorrow night on this program, we'll bring you our conversation with frank rich. he takes a critical look of what went wrong for the gop and the prospects of moving forward. that should be a good conversation tomorrow night. tonight, we wanted to start this week with the story that is shaking up washington. the sudden resignation of cia director david petraeus. thomas ricks is a pulitzer prize-winning journalist and a best-selling author. he is a fellow at the center for a new american security. good to have you back on this program. let's get the petraeus stuff at of the way first. i want to go straight to your b
of us. what people did remember is that we are a rich country. risis is really an opportunity to harness our abundant resources in ways that will position us better for the future. >> we will speak with sarah anderson of the institute for policy studies about her new report, "the ceo campaign to 'fix' the debt: a trojan horse for massive corporate tax breaks." all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. president obama is holding the first of a series of meetings at the white house today on averting the so-called fiscal cliff of expiring tax cuts and automatic spending reductions set to take effect at the end of the year. under the terms of last year's debt deal, obama and senate democrats must agree on a deficit reduction package with house republicans or face automatic cuts that will likely contract the economy. labor groups including the heads of the afl-cio and seiu will sit down with obama today, followed by corporate ceo's on wednesday. the president has vowed to@ resist republican calls for extending tax cu
the future that lies ahead. you elected us to focus on your jobs, not ours. in the coming weeks and months, out and working with leaders of both parties to meet the challenges we can only solve together. reducing our deficit, reforming our tax codes, fixing our immigration system, freeing ourselves from foreign oil. we have more work to do. >> mitt romney won the traditional republican states, but ended up with only one swing state victory, taking north carolina. after reports that his campaign was questioning the results in ohio, romney finally emerged shortly before 1:00 a.m. eastern standard time to announce he had conceded the race. >> i have just called president obama to congratulate him on his victory. his supporters and his campaign also deserve congratulations. i wish all of them well, particularly, the president, the first lady, and their daughters. this is a time of great challenges for america, and i pray that the president will be successful in guiding our nation. >> president obama will again face a divided congress, with democrats increasing their senate majority by one seat
, especially our veterans who have served us so bravely and have sacrificed so selflessly in our name. we carry on knowing that our best days always lie ahead. >> a major new investigation reveals how thousands of veterans are being denied disability benefits due to errors by the department of veterans affairs. >> there is nearly out of resources and in about of accumulated trauma that these soldiers, marines, and air men are experiencing, because of the war itself, continues to accumulate the law the war goes on. the military is playing catch- up more than 16,000 veterans are homeless. an estimated 18 veterans commit suicide every year. this is democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. "the new york times"is reporting high-level officials were notified in the late summer about the decision of david petraeus to resign. the relationship between him and his biographer paula broadwell was uncovered in an investigation. members of congress have complained they were not informed of the findings until just after the election. as head of the cia, petraeus oversaw the
. for the first time, the majority of the island's voters supported a non-binding referendum to become a full u.s. state. we will speak with the nation magazine's john nichols president of his new mandate for the next four years. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. president obama return to the white house on wednesday hours after his convincing win over republican challenger mitt romney in the 2012 election. aides say obama has immediately turned to the so-called fiscal cliff of $700 billion in expiring tax cuts and automatic spending reductions set to take effect at the end of the year. under the terms of last year's debt deal, obama and senate democrats must agree on a deficit reduction package with house republicans or face automatic cuts that will likely contract the economy. on wednesday, both senate majority leader harry reid and house speaker john boehner pledged to negotiate in good faith. >> the american people want us to work together. republicans and democrats want us to work together. they want a balan
votes once the results come through. if we look at the u.s. congress, meanwhile, republicans maintained control of the lower house, democrats have kept their majority in the upper house. this is how those electoral votes stack up, state-by-state. mitt romney, 206 electoral votes, president obama, 303. compared to the last election, president obama 1365 electoral votes, john mccain won on hundred 73. back then, we should say that he won n.c. and indiana, but those states went to mitt romney this time around. let's get the full story of the night from our washington correspondent. >> the first family, stepping out to a second term. to the strains of signed, sealed, committed. looking forward to the inspiration from the voters. >> you, the american people, reminded us that while our road has been hard, while our journey has been long, we have to pick ourselves up, we have fought our way back, and we know in our hearts that for the united states of america, the best is yet to come. [applause] >> by then it was nearly 2:00 in the morning, the culmination of an exhilarating night. >> this is
politics forward using a down-to-earth approach. >> reporter: noda identified three top priorities for his administration -- reconstruction from the march, 2011 earthquake and tsunami, containment of the fukushima nuclear accident, and fiscal restructuring and economic growth. the new prime minister called on all main parties to tackle the issues together. noda's diplomacy focused on the japan/u.s. alliance. former prime minister hatoyama saw relations fray over the relocation of a u.s. base in okina okinawa. noda agreed with the u.s. to strengthen cooperation on bilateral security in the face of china's growing presence in the region. noda also made the controversial decision to restart nuclear reactors for the first time since fukushima. >> translator: i decided to restart nuclear reactors to protect people's way of life. >> reporter: dpj members who had supported noda criticized him. some even left the party. noda's biggest challenge was reforming japan's tax and social security systems. he publicly laid his political career on the line for this goal. influential party leaders strongly
are glad you joined us. a conversation with oliver stone and peter kuznick coming up. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: we are just hours away from polls opening on the east coast. it could be a long night. only time will tell how this raised will turn out in history, but history is. we want to bring you a unique project from oliver stone. the two have teamed up for an unprecedented showtime series called the untold history of the united states. the show kicks off on showtime and also features his companion botook. first of preview of the untold history of the united states. >> roosevelt made his solos move yet. the stakes have rarely been higher in a presidential election, and roosevelt s
at it in a new way. >> the academy award winning filmmaker oliver stone joins us in the studio with his partner peter kuznick to talk about their new book and tv series looking at the classified america we were never meant to see. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. israel is continuing to pound the gaza strip with airstrikes amidst fears that israel could launch a ground invasion. at least 21 palestinians have died in the most recent round of violence while three israelis died on thursday. israel said it launched 150 airstrikes overnight while palestinians fired a dozen rockets into israel. among the casualties was the 11- month-old son of a bbc arabic journalist. an associated press photo showed jihad misharawi clutching the wrapped body of his baby, who was killed by an israeli round that struck his home on wednesday. white house press secretary jay carney told reporters thursday -- speaking later thursday, mark toner said the onus is on hamas to stop the violence. >> the onus here is on hamas. as jay carney j
"lincoln" stars and daniel day lewis and tommy lee jones. we are glad that you joined us. a conversation with sally field coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: what a pleasure to welcome sally field to this program. the oscar winner has been a beloved actress. currently starring in what is the most talked about films of "lincoln" lincoln quote. a trip down memory lane. can we do that? >> i guess so. tavis: a small sampling of your award winning career. >> you know, i was on broadway wants. >> really? >> for almost 12 minutes. the show closed the first night. i was so good. you should have seen me. he's going to take you and the fire department to get me out
around and try to extort the full amount from us. >> that is where the role in tripoli, sen. it raises money to buy the debt. >> but instead of collecting on it, we will abol an offshoot ofl street has launched a new limit to about the people, not the banks by buying up distressed debt from financial firms and canceling it so that borrowers do not have to repay. then, "tasing ice." >> 1984, the glacier was 11 miles away. today, is back here. the glacier is retreating but it is also thinning at the same time. >> the new documentary looks at how photographer james balog captured climate change on film by placing two dozen time lapse cameras throughout the arctic and other areas to film melting glaciers. he will join us live. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. israel is threatening to launch a ground invasion of the gaza strip after breaking an informal ceasefire with a series of deadly attacks. on wednesday, an israeli airstrike assassinated the head of hamas' military wing. the bombing continued, killing
at home! >> that future is out there! it is waiting for us! >> tonight, a special edition of charlie rose. >> rose: a politician thinks of the next election, a statesman of the next generation so says james free man clarke. while all the world focuses on the election results, e we want to raise this question: where is america 2012, 236 years after its birth, and where is it going? the challenge for the next administration are both immediate and deep. no great country has sustained its position without a strong economic foundation. the new president and new congress must deal with the fiscal cliff, partisan gridlock has prevented us from making the hard decisions about where we need to spend and where we need to cut and how we bridge a growing economic inequality. while we remain the richest country in the world, the global economic order is rebalancing. the application of american power is changing as we have seen in the response to the arab spring. old alliances need redefining. the pivot to the east demands understanding between china and the united states and the realization that it is
to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: part two of our conversation with oliver stone and peter kusnick. their 10-part series on showtime kicks off next monday night. now is another preview of "the. history of the united states. " -- "the untold story of the united states. " >> i steadied american history. it made sense. we were the center of the world. there was manifest destiny and we were the good guys. i have traveled the world now. i continue my education as an infantryman in vietnam. made a lot of movies, some of them about history. and i have learned a lot more about what i once knew. and when i heard from my children what they're learning in school, i was perturbed that they were not getting the more honest view of the world and i did. we lived most of our lives in a fog. but i will let my children to have access to something that looks beyond what i recall as the tyranny of now. >> material now. tavis: the you think a 10-part series on showtime, a companion book
communications >> right here at home. >> that future is out there waiting for us. >> rose: a politician thinks of the next election, a statesman of the next gentlemen of the jury race said the theologian james clerk and you can't govern in poetry or pros. we want to raise this question. where is america 2012, 236 years after its birth and where is it going, the challenge of the next administration to both immediate and deep. no great country sustained its position without a strong economic foundation. the new president and new congress must deal with a fiscal cliff. partisan grid lock has present us from making hard decisions about where we need to stand and where we need to cut and how we bridge a growing economic inequity. while we remain the richest country of the world the economic order is rebalancing. economic powers are changing as we've seen to the response of the arab spring. defining east, demands between china and the united states and the realization it is not a zero sum game. there are problems that transcend are lationships, climate change global health and science. science and t
sitting in with us, and chris hedges also with us. this is democracy now!, our six- hour special, and we welcome stations to our broadcast. the polls are closing, including in the key swing state of virginia, and both president obama and mitt romney are claiming they have enough votes to when the weight house -- the white house. polls have just closed in pennsylvania, in michigan, missouri, illinois, massachusetts, in maine and north dakota, and the latest projections showed president obama winning vt., while mitt romney has won georgia, indiana, kentucky, west virginia, and south carolina, they say. abc news is reporting joe manchin is reported to win reelection against the republican businessmen. that is what we know so far, and, yes, the networks have also called vermont for president obama. in a moment, we are going to go to vermont. they have also called the race for governor, and peter there will return it -- retain his governorship, and also, independent senator bernie sanders of vermont has won reelection. a longtime labor, racial justice, an activist and columnist, the f
disqualify ballots not accompanied by a form accurately documenting the type of identification used. attorneys for the northeast ohio coalition for the homeless and service employees international union have filed a challenge in court. in florida, democrats filed a lawsuit seeking to force republican governor rick scott to extend early voting. he and the republican state legislature reduced early voting last year, and now voters are seeing waits of more than six hours at the polls. on sunday, a judge ordered hours to be extended after a bomb threat closed one location for several hours. we will have more on this later in the broadcast. new figures show outside groups such as super pacs have spent $1.1 billion on the 2012 elections. the figure marks a 400% increase over outside spending in 2008 to more than 60% of the nearly $441 million raised by super pacs came from a group of just 91 people. a separate report has them dark money groups which are able to donate anonymously and have spent $213 million through november 1, with 81% of the money colon to republican candidates. syria's
around pay equity, it shows us once again how the republican party fails to address the issues that are specifically important. >> that was not true. romney talked about -- let me finish. when he was governor. women came to him -- >> that's not true. >> can i talk? women wanted time, they wanted flexible work schedules. they shared jobs where they can go home. you know what he said in that debate, it's important for women to be home with their kids and job share. it's not about lily ledbetter. >> what's going to sway those undecided votersci in swing stas >> continuing discussion about swing jobs. >> let us know what you think. please follow me on twitter @bonnieerbe. from women voters to gender equity across the pond. >> the european parliament has rejected luxembourg's top central banker for a job at the european central bank, an unprecedented move taken to protest the lack of women within the organization's leadership. parliament members want european union leaders to recruit more women candidates. there are no women in any of the top leadership posts at the bank. the parlia
category called a typical antipsychotics. d it really speaks to the fact that we have a buys, all of us, consumers, physicians, we assume that new means improved. and in fact, what is really true is that needs to be established by solid evidence and not just assumption. this is a very important study for the federal government. very important study for state government. because this category of drugs is a substantial expense for the medicaid program. >> what's the cost between haldol and the new drug that came out? >> it's a difference between haldol and a entire category, the a typical antisigh cotics. it's a many expense. that doesn't mean haldol is the right drug for every patient but what this study demonstrate said when you look at a large population, for a substantial number of patients, the older now available as a generic drug, is in fact more effective at controlling symptoms than the newer category of drugs. so it just speaks to the issue of first of all, the treatment needs to be at a lord to the individual and that if -- tailored -- we need to enter into the prescribing proc
to take the vote away from us." some people stood in line for six, seven and eight hours. some had been in areas that had been damaged by the storm. and i just think that they were there upholding democracy. so that's the first thing that i remember about it. >> they were also there making delicious pecan tarts. because when i voted, the kids in the school were selling baking goods, and they were having a great time of it. what will you remember? >> oh, that's a tough one to say. i think that for a lot of conservatives and a lot of republicans this was a very disappointing election that opened a lot of folks' eyes to some of the deeper changes that have happened in the country, much more so in some respects than the 2008 election -- which i think a lot of folks wrote off as a one off, as a fluke, something that reflected very unique historical circumstances. but i think this election really did demonstrate that there's been a dramatic change, particularly with regard to social issues and how folks talk about them. so i think that that has proven very sobering already for a lot of folks
buddhists are trying to drive out muslims who they say don't belong in burma. these muslim men showed us scars from the assault on their village two weeks ago, an assault backed, they say, by the police and army. this woman describes the moment her husband was killed by a bullet while he was trying to doups the flames in the burning mosque. she zpares now over how she and her children will survive. -- she despairs now over how she and her children will survive. this is a nearby town. there are victims on both sides, buddhists and muslim. but the muslim rahinjas have borne the brunt of the violence. what happened to this village and many others wasn't a spontaneous outburst of ethnic anger. all the evidence we heard from victims paints a picture of a planned, organized attack in which the security forces at best did nothing, and at worst, took part. it's pushed them as muslims into ever smaller ghetto-liken claves and cast a shadow over the start of this country's democratic journey. more than 100,000 people have been left homeless and hungry, a part of burma already blighted by poverty.
will be the next president. hello and welcome. also coming up in the program, following hard on the heels of the u.s. results, a change in the top in china. what will this mean for the rest of the world? and terrible facts of life for one 15-year-old pakistani girl killed acid by her parents for looking at a boy. hello, it is midday here in london, 6:00 in the morning in madison, wisconsin where president obama is schedule told appear at the start of this, the final day of campaigning, in what's been a grueling and hugely expensive 18 month battle with mitt romney a third of americans have already cast their votes lerl i. both men now have less than 24 hours to convince the undecided in a handful of swing states to come on boards. with the polls pointing to a dead heat, still everything to play for. let's get the latest from my colleague jane hill who joins us live from washington. jane, over to you. >> hello and welcome. the u.s. presidential election campaign has entered its final day with the candidates fighting for every vote in those marginal states which will decide who will spend the next fou
with the dominican brothers. >>> welcome, i'm bob abernethy. it's good to have you with us. much of the east coast is still grappling with the devastation of hurricane sandy. the storm affected at least 17 states, caused massive flooding and left millions without power. religious leaders, including pope benedict xvi, prayed for the victims and for a strong recovery. and many faith-based groups quickly rallied to help those impacted by the storm. among them, the north american mission board, the relief arm of the southern baptist convention. mike ebert is the mission board's vice president for communications. he joins us from the board's headquarters in atlanta, georgia. mike, welcome. let me begin with getting -- inviting you to talk about the extent of the sbc's efforts here. how many people do you have? what are you doing? >> well, bob, we have 82,000 trained disaster relief volunteers. 1,500 disaster relief units and we will by monday be at a 400,000 meal capacity. so we'll be preparing 400,000 hot meals to be served to victims and other first responders and that will be kind of the beginning p
broadwell all of this access. all of us had access to general petraeus over the years when he wants us around and tell us something. but this was different. he really allowed her to go everywhere with him. he talked to her all the time. i've talked to many aides, they were concerned about it in afghanistan. they were concerned how it looked, the optics of having this woman all the time. they described her as gushy and inappropriate talking about his thoughts. you've seen her on several programs over the last week. and things she was saying about him. that made them uncomfortable. >> well like martha, i've known him for about a decade, covered him in these war jones. he's a disciplined man, a man with incredible force of will. as much as we talk about his counterinsurgency doctrine, when i think about what happened in iraq, it was really david petraeus' will power in that battle space in the way he changed people's expectations what was possible, what was striking. so to see a man of that intensity get involved with another very intense person paula broadwell, i'm surprised by the lack
senior political commentator joins us. what prompted the prime minister to act? >> they met all the conditions the prime minister set including helping to pass bills to enact the budget cutting the number of lawmakers and making the disparate and representation smaller. there is a big disparate now between densely and sparsely populated constituencies, so eventually he has no excuses left. but it took some time. noda got caught up in his own words. back in august the prime minister needed to convince the opposition to pass bills to reform social security and hike the consumption tax. he promised them that he would dissolve the lower house, in his words, sometime soon. so noda could not hold out forever. >> now that voters could be going to the polls, what will they be considering when they cast their ballots? >> well, some of them look at this election as a referendum on noda's records, i think. his approval rating has hit a new low and his delay in calling an election drove support for his democratic party to its low. he angered many japanese by raising the consumption tax. and
transition unfold in beijing. he joins us now. jam james. >> reporter: the communist party unveiled its new leadership a day after its long, week-long congress wrapped up. after many months of speculation, we found out who is taking charge in less than a minute. now the future of the world's most populous nation is in the hands of seven men. [ applause ] xi and six other senior officials appeared before the media inside the great hall of the people in beijing. >> translator: our responsibility is to rally and lead the party and chinese people of all ethnic groups. we take up the historical baton from the older generation. >> reporter: china's new leader vowed to take action on issues such as jobs, social security and corruption. >> translator: in the new environment, our party faces many tough challenges. there are numerous pressing problems within the party and senior ranks that need to be resolved, especially corruption and the acceptance of bribes. >> reporter: xi jinping is taking over the position of general secretary from hu jintao. he will lead the politburo's standing committee, chi
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